Learn about the supporting Lingo that goes with Foosball
 
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Glossary of Terms
The Ivan
A 5-4 victory
The Scoop
3-bar/3-rod:
Alien (shot)
Aerial shot:
ATSF
Brush
Calcutta
Brush Pass
Curve
Cut-back
Foos-shark
Goalie delight
Pin
Winners' Bracket
Zone defense
 
The Ivan

When you score on yourself.
 
A 5-4 victory

This is what separates winners from losers.
 
The Scoop

When you push or pull the ball either way.
 
3-bar/3-rod:

Either of the two "offensive" bars, each with three men. The third rod away from the goal.
 
Alien (shot)

A novelty shot in which the ball is moved on a rod intended for the right hand (2-bar or 3-bar, and in singles the 5-bar also), but upon being shot, is shot by cranking the rod with the left hand. Usually done with the 3-bar. See also "crank (shot)" -bar/2-rod:
Either of the two defensive bars, each with 2 men. The second rod away from the goal.
 
Aerial shot:

A defensive shot where the ball is caught on an almost- horizontally oriented man, then flipped through the air over the rods toward the opposite goal. If the ball hits the top of the table, the shot is not valid. There are several ways to catch the ball, and several places to balance the ball on the man, depending on the table-type. Also "Rainbow Shot", "Goalie Field Goal".
 
ATSF

American Table Soccer Federation
 
Brush

To hit the ball so that it moves in an angle due to a pushing or pulling movement of the rod as the ball is struck; this motion is in essence a "brushing" of the ball and gives it the high (or low) spin required to angle the ball. In passing, the ball is often placed behind the rod, just less than where a tight back-pin would be. This maximizes the brush effect by "squeezing" the ball, but may erroneously cause a squibb pass.
 
Calcutta

Organized betting, usually on seeded teams in Open events. Often the right to a bet on a specific team goes to the highest bidder, and sometimes the payouts are percentages of the total amount wagered by all parties. Betting on yourself is allowed.
 
Brush Pass

A 5-bar pass executed using a brush in either direction. this pass is usually executed with the closest man on the five-bar in the vicinity of the near wall; upon passing, the ball is slightly to the rear of the rod (just less than where a tight back-pin would be) and is often transferred to the closest man on the five bar from a tenuous (not tight) back-pin on the second-man. From here, the ball can basically be lane-passed or wall-passed from the same position, ideally in the center of this near man's field of movement. The brush gives the ball a high spin to angle the ball in either direction, and in the case of a wall pass from far off of the wall, the spin serves to keep the ball "hugging" the wall all the way down to the three bar. A slight squeeze will give the ball such a spin. Often, the left arm posture for the five bar is a palm-up underhand one with the elbow pointing directly to the left, to provide leverage for the brush motion. Other common options are an off-the-wall lane brush and a 2nd-man brush through the lane to the wall. In addition to the 5- to 3-bar pass, a 2- to 5-bar brush pass is common in singles play.
 
Curve

A shot or pass in which the ball's path curves due to extreme spin put on the ball, which originates from a very high-pressure (back) pin position, which then is released as the rod is moved to the left or right as the pressure on the pin is maintained, resulting in the spin. Most often seen as a 2- to 3-rod pass (back-pin ball on 2-rod 2 to 4 ball lengths from the wall, and curve the ball by moving the rod away from the wall; the ball curves _towards_ the wall to the waiting 3-man on the wall) or a trick 3-rod shot.
 
Cut-back

An angle shot in which the ball is moving in one lateral direction (left or right) before being shot, but is angled toward the goal in the opposite direction (right or left) upon being shot, often resulting in the defense to continue moving past the actual trajectory of the ball. May be combined with pull, push, or various kick shots. May also be used in passing, especially 2-bar to 3-bar passing.
 
Foos-shark

Somebody you should have looked up in the Book before you put money on the table, even though they looked drunk.
 
Goalie delight

A rule that every time the goalie (defensive player) scores, as a reward the next ball is dropped into play in their defensive zone instead of being served normally. The condition usually does not apply on the last point of a game, i.e. the first ball of the next game does not go to the goalie.
 
Pin

The position when the ball is being squeezed between the playing field and the bottom of a man; this naturally must occur with the man tilted with its toe to the front or to the back, which are known as front-pin and back-pin, respectively. Sometimes, pin is used in the context of a ball being squeezed between a man and the wall. Also known as "pinch". A "walking pin" is when the ball is continuously moved horizontally from the pinned position, only to be pinned again on the same bar.

The table element which affixes the men to the rods, taking the place of both nut and bolt of some tables. The advantage is that there is no thread (as on a screw) to be worn off to make the men loose.

 
Winners' Bracket

The section of the tournament tree in a double elimination tournament in which those teams which have not lost any matches play each other. Losing teams in the winner's bracket enter successively progressive berths in the loser's bracket. The winner of this bracket is referred to as "winners of the winners US. This team plays the "winner of the losers'" for the tournament title, which it wins if it wins a single match, and can lose only if it loses in two straight matches, because of the double-elimination format.
 
Zone defense

A defense against a 2-bar shot, which involves the 3-bar and 5-bar covering part of the goal, and the goalie-bar and 2-bar covering the other part; frequently the 3-bar and 5-bar will cover "long", leaving the straight and near shots open but covered by the defensive bars. Usually the #3 and 4 men on the five bar, together with the middle man on the three bar cover long, while the center goalie covers the edge of the goal, and the #1 man on the two bar cover the remaining area of "short", while these two defensive men are slightly angled toward each other to guard the "split" between them; these numberings refer to counting the men from the edge of the rod, beginning on the side nearest to the side the ball is currently on (in the opposing side's defensive area).
 
 
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